Radici Del Sud 2013 – Impressions and Results


On 5 – 9 June this year, the 2013 version of Radici del Sud took place at the lovely Masseria Caselli resort near Carovigno in Apulia. For reasons of spreading the good word about the wines of the South, Nicola Campanile invites new sets of jurors for the wine competition every year, so I was not part of the initial days this time ’round. I was, however, given the chance of participating at the producer sessions on 9 June, and how could I miss that?

I aired my great enthusiasm for the Radici del Sud event in this very large post last year: https://oleudsenwineblog.wordpress.com/2012/07/04/radici-del-sud-2012-impressions-and-results/. For the obvious reason that my participation this year was much briefer, this post will not be as long, but I did cram in quite a lot of tasting on the single day of participation, and I do have comments to some of the various winners and runners-up in the various categories, so here goes:

IMPRESSIONS:
Radici del Sud goes from strength to strength. The number of participating wineries this year was the largest ever, and the concept keeps being improved. New to this year’s edition was an entire day of tasting open to the public and a gala dinner on the final evening. There were also several vertical tastings in order to give an even better impression of the ageing potential of some of the protagonists of the South. Nicola Campanile and all his collaborators (including Luciano Pignataro, Franco Ziliani, Marina Alaimo, Francesca Tamburello, Giovanni Gagliardi, Manila Benedetto, Giuseppe Barretta and Enzo Pietrantonio) deserve the highest praise for arranging an event that – from where I stand – looks like it is equally successful for the participating wineries and the wine writers and importers.

It was great to be back and meet so many of my friends and colleagues, and in particular to make new friendships and taste new producers. The South never fails to turn up great new producers and new trends and tendencies, but one of the strong suits in recent years has been that there are now many wineries capable of demonstrating a track record of great and ageworthy wines. The world won’t discover these wines unless they can show such a track record, and I sense that with the increasing availability of wines with exactly that, we are about to see a sea change in the way the world at large views Southern Italian wine.

As usual, the ambience was happy and positive. I get so much enjoyment and energy out of meeting all these dedicated and forward-looking people. This is not to say that their lives are not mostly hard work, but they seem to derive such satisfaction and pride from it, and that is inspirational.

A few impressions from my tastings and discussions, in no particular order:
– The Cirò area is really blooming with small and medium-sized producers now. There is a new understanding of the red gaglioppo variety, which emphasizes light colour, light to medium weight, great juiciness and drinkability, but without committing treason towards the rather formidable tannin potential of the variety. For me this suits the variety much better than past attempts at pumping up gaglioppo to something it wasn’t. There is a real sense of place and pride these days. The following four producers are at the front of the new Cirò breed:
– 1. Du Cropio confirmed its status at the head of the table for me. Wines of intense fruit, great density, yet supple, and then that fierce tannin hit. Owner Giuseppe Ippolito reaffirmed this wine’s ancient and place-specific heritage by serving it along with great local pecorino from Crotone and the most amazingly fantastic chili salamis I have ever tasted, made from the highest quality pork you can imagine. Calabrian food is traditionally fiercely hot, and the soft, sweet plum fruit and the powerful tannins of gaglioppo marry so well with the rounded, spicy heat. Try it before you die.
– 2. Sergio Arcuri makes fairly natural, tight and juicy Cirò with a really good sense of terroir.
– 3. Cote di Franze make marine, spicy, supple Ciròs, both white, rosé and red, the latter with obvious potential for spectacular tertiary development.
– 4. A’ Vita make highly personal, garrigue-herbal, walnutty, quite “natural wine”-oriented rosé and red Cirò; very interesting and with the potential for spectacular tertiary development.
– Ferrocinto, also from Calabria, but from the Pollino area, confirmed its mastery with the magliocco variety. Another beautiful, juicy, sappy, highly alive and drinkable wine this year (and a confirmed medal winner).
– Guastaferro showed up again with a slightly wider range of aglianico (Irpinia and Taurasi) red wines, all beautiful, powerful interpretations of their categories, with spectacular terroir fidelity and great, spicy personality. I particularly liked the 2008 Irpinia Rosso called Meminì and the 2004 Taurasi called Primum. New was an accomplished white, a Greco di Tufo. Three medals were deservedly awarded.
– Sarno 1860 also reappeared, and their Fiano di Avellino white wine (they are a single-wine estate) confirmed itself at the top of the category. Lovely, and deserved medals.
– Tenuta del Barone also showed up, and reconfirmed my enthusiasm at their great, characterful Fiano di Avellino. Also awarded, and highly recommended.
– Aglianico del Vulture is at the beginning of a strong renaissance. There is now a handful of really good to great producers that are wrestling with the daunting but ultimately deeply satisfying task of extracting maximum terroir from this variety on the slopes of that extinct volcano, and then softening the humungous tannins that necessarily result into something drinkable without oxidizing the wine. They are really succeeding now, and resulting wines are fabulous. I tasted the wines of the following two producers, but there are others that deserve attention:
– 1. Terra dei Re make a range of lovely Aglianico del Vulture, with the great Nocte, from night-harvested grapes, at the top. This has great power, but married to great aromatic and structural freshness. Also a very surprisingly good, fresh and delicious semi-sweet rosé sparkler from aglianico and pinot noir. Whodathunk?
– 2. Grifalco continue a strong run with wines that start at the fairly easy-drinking end of the spectrum and work their way towards the powerful, complex, traditional end. I really like the ethos here, and the thoughtful, insightful treatment of the fabulous grape material you can obtain in this amazing terroir.
– I have written it before, but it is still the case: It seems to me that the great Apulian red variety of negroamaro is at a bit of a crossroads these days. On the one hand there are some magnificent examples being made in the style pioneered by the great Severino Garofano, made with super-ripe grapes and with controlled oxidation. I love this style of wine, but it might seem a bit old-style and tertiary to many modern-day consumers. On the other hand, there are some wineries making much more modern, directly fruity wines, but they very often seem to be too cold-fermented, too slick, too devoid of the magnificent character and terroir imprint of which this great variety is surely capable. And they all too frequently have been new-oaked to oblivion. The result is frequently horrible and unrecognizable, and so we are left with the great old style if we want great negroamaro. So, whence the modern-day saviour of negroamaro? Well, a couple of the answers would lie with wineries that were not participants at Radici del Sud, such as the baroque but utterly convincing efforts from Gianfranco Fino (Jo) and Mille Una (Capitolo Laureto), but these are ultra-small-production, very expensive wines that very few are likely to run into in their lifetimes. The following three producers represent, first, the best example of Severino Garofano’s school, and then two wineries that seem to me to be working towards squaring the circle of negroamaro modernity with character:
– 1. Tenuta Monaci. This is Severino Garofano’s own property, now ably run by children Renata and Stefano. Their rosé Girofle is always among the best, and so is their red Le Braci, made from 100% late-picked old-vine negroamaro. Both wines have been and remain among my favourite Apulian wines, and not for sentimental reasons, but simply because they are fantastic wines in their own right. The rest of the range is of comparable quality.
– 2. Masseria l’Astore. This property started out with expensive and famous consultancy, using quite a lot of oak. The saving grace was a high proportion of old-vine negroamaro grown ad alberello, i.e. as bush vines. The quality of the raw materials shone through the rough treatment. However, in recent years, they have started moving away from the over-enthusiastic use of oak, and towards something I think has a much more balanced expression. Their old-vine Alberelli di Negroamaro for me is the first contender for best modern-style negroamaro wine right now, with great strength of fruit and lovely weight and density, yet a more modern, polished feel. I still would like to see even less oak, and perhaps slightly less of the polish, more of the typical garrigue, spice and bakelite/graphite notes that I love in negroamaro, but I do think that this is a highly accomplished wine. Full marks also to their white wine Krita.
– 3. I Buongiorno. This was a new outfit for me, having marketed its first wines this year, but it does have impeccable credentials. The Buongiorno family are famous restaurateurs, owning the famous Già Sotto l’Arco restaurant which is frequently hailed as the best restaurant in Apulia. The decision to start making own wine must have been a very obvious one in this sea of vines that is Apulia. I tasted three wines, a lovely, minerally white minutolo, a good primitivo, and a really promising negroamaro, all made from vineyards in the Brindisi area. The latter, in particular, had many of the same qualities that I liked in the l’Astore Alberelli, it being fresh, fruity, yet weighty and dense, and notably free of obvious new oak influence. My only criticism was, once again, that the wine was just slightly too polished, and could be further improved with a bit more wildness and character. For a first commercial outing, I certainly thought the wines were highly accomplished, and I expect great things from this producer.
– From the extreme west of Sicily, at Trapani, Verovini are making some really interesting wines. I particularly liked their 100% frappato Neri, with lively, dark berry fruit, mediterranean scrub and hydrocarbon minerality (curio note: frappato from western Sicily may in fact be carignan), the 50 frappato/50 nero d’Avola Ciamma, lively, juicy, with dark berries and spices, and the award-winning 100% nero d’Avola Niuru. This latter wine married great dark-berry fruitiness with a juicy, lively, yet dense and weighty, structure and great minerality. Nero d’Avola really has a thousand faces, changes enormously with the terroir, and this one was a particularly good one, miles away from the dark, brooding, heavily extracted and oaky examples that can be a bit of a pain to drink, however impressive.
– Primitivo from the Gioia del Colle zone is really on a roll these days:
– 1. Pietraventosa reconfirmed themselves among the best of Gioia del Colle. Last year I loved their wines but had small reservations concerning the new oak influence on their top wine. I have had that wine, the 2007 Riserva, many times since then, and must admit that my criticism was groundless. It has shrugged off the oak beautifully, and is now a strong, dense, muscular version of primitivo destined for a long, spectacular life. New from Pietraventosa was the EstRosa, a rosé wine made with primitivo with a little bit of aglianico in it. I am normally wary of rosés made from primitivo, because they can tend towards flabbiness and too-obvious fruit sweetness, but not so here; the EstRosa was a lovely, juicy, minerally, fresh rosé with real character. A very deserved medal winner.
– 2. Fatalone also showed some lovely wines, of which I have written before, in a fairly traditional mould, with hints of that Bovril umami note that adds some deep interest. What I would want to signal here, though, was a tank sample of their 2011 primitivo. This was lovely, powerful, but vibrant and minerally, with great fruit expression. More of that, please!
– 3. I first met Paolo Patruno, of Tenuta Patruno Perniola, on the sidelines of the 2012 Vinitaly show. His wines were really lovely, with great freshness and minerality stemming from the always windy conditions and altitude of his vineyards. Paolo struck me as the ideal rising star of the area: He already makes lovely wine, but combines it with an inquisitve, searching mindset. Paolo will never quite feel he is there, so I predict that he will go from strength to strength in his quest for improvement. The set of wines he presented at Radici del Sud this year was even better than what I tasted last year, so – long live confirmation bias – I feel vindicated in my faith in him. I am not alone in liking his wines, though, as he brought home a well-deserved award.
– Nobody’s resting on their laurels in Apulia’s other primitivo capital, Manduria, though. I have previously waxed lyrical about the great, traditional primitivos of Vinicola Savese/Pichierri, and they did not let me down this time. One of the hallmarks of this producer is the ageing of part of the production in large, traditional, glazed terracottta amphorae called capasone, and on this occasion they presented two wines that had been aged in those containers: The 2009 single-vineyard primitivo called Ajanca, aged for 10 months in capasone, with great, intense, essence-of-cherry and blueberry fruit expression and the lightly oxidized notes of their distinctive winemaking. And the non-vintage Capasonato, which was a blend of primitivos from 1984 and 1985, aged 29 and 28 years, respectively, in capasone. This latter wine was a marvel, amazingly fresh, firm and intense, very alive, with dried fruits, spices, a tiny hint of clay (!) and many years of development ahead of it. Very few bottles made, but get hold of one if you can; you will not only be drinking great wine, but also tradition and the result of a millennial Mediterranean history of winemaking.
– On the day after the event, I had the pleasure and great joy to be invited for lunch at the Cibus restaurant in Ceglie Messapica. Certainly, the company (Nicola Campanile, Franco Ziliani, Manila Benedetto, Giusppe Barretta and Giovanni Gagliardi) was exquisite, and for sure the hosting was as violently benevolent as I have ever encountered, with a virtual carpet-bombing of dishes, but that only goes some way towards explaining the total bliss of the meal. A large part of the honour simply goes to the fantastic dishes served, and without demeaning anything else in the glorious meal, I would venture that the cheese cave itself is worth any journey from anywhere. Miss it at your peril.
– My discovery of the trip, though, was Villa Diamante, a producer that I – I admit it – had only been vaguely aware of so far. On this occasion I had the enormous pleasure of meeting owner/winemaker Antoine Gaita, a Belgian-born Italian. Antoine was a great personality, in great equilibrium, but forceful, mythbusting, scientifically-minded, direct and with a very clear vision of what he wants to achieve. This shone through in the 2010 Fiano di Avellino Vigna della Congregazione we tasted together, a tight, minerally, dense, intense and complex number holding great promise for future development. Prior to my arrival at the event, there had been a vertical tasting of his wine, and all my friends were in awe, but just how great his wine can become with age I was not to discover until the next day, at Cibus, where we tasted the Vigna della Congregazione 2003. This was an out-and-out revelation, with dense, tight fruitiness, great freshness, yet supple and broad, and with an enormous hydrocarbon minerality akin to the greatest rieslings. I was bowled over, and even more so when tasted with podolico burrata dusted with local Apulian truffles. I had a semi-metaphysical experience right there.

I don’t properly know how I managed to get back home to Denmark, but Southern Italy is addictive, and I will be back shortly.

And now on to:

RESULTS:

FALANGHINA
1st Wine National Jury
Fois, Falanghina del Sannio DOC, 2012 – Cautiero
2nd Wine National Jury
Nummus, IGP Beneventano, 2012 – Terre dei Vuttari

1st Wine International Jury
Fois, Falanghina del Sannio DOC, 2012 – Cautiero
2nd Wine International Jury
Nummus, IGP Beneventano, 2012 – Terre dei Vuttari

My comment: It is rare that the juries completely agree, but this was one such occasion.

WHITE WINES FROM NATIVE GRAPES (PUGLIA AND BASILICATA)
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Dammisole, Moscato IGT Puglia, 2012 – D’Alfonso del Sordo
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Il Castillo, Locorotondo DOC, 2012 – Cardone Vini Classici

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Krita, IGP Salento, 2012 – L’Astore Masseria
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Petraluce, IGT Salento, 2012 – Castello Monaci

My comment: Krita and Il Castillo are both perennial favourites of mine, so no surprises there, but of course a joy to see them prevail again.

GRECO BIANCO – CAMPANIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Greco di Tufo DOCG, 2012 – Terre d’Aione
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Picoli, Greco di Tufo DOCG, 2011 – Cantina Bambinuto

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Picoli, Greco di Tufo DOCG, 2011 – Cantina Bambinuto
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Greco di Tufo DOCG, 2012 – Terre d’Aione

WHITE WINES FROM NATIVE GRAPES (MINUTOLO, FIANO, BOMBINO) – PUGLIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Jody, IGT Murgia, 2012 – Conte Spagnoletti Zeuli
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Kimia, IGT Puglia, 2012 – Nicola Chiaromonte

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Maliluna, IGP Puglia, 2012 – Paolo Leo
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Rampone, IGT Valle d’Itria, 2012 – I Pastini

My comments: I have a love, nay, a craving for I Pastini’s white wines, and the Rampone in particular. Last year, the I Pastini wines did not compete, as their maker, the legendary Pasquale “Lino” Carparelli, was part of the jury, but I am happy to see the Rampone in its rightful place among the best of Southern Italy’s (and Apulia’s) wines this year. Apulia, in general, is really moving fast in the white wine department now.

CATARRATTO – SICILIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Terre di Ginestra, IGP Terre Siciliane, 2012 – Calatrasi
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Chara, IGP Terre Siciliane, 2012 – Feudo Disisa

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Etna Bianco, Etna DOC, 2012 – Patria Vini
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Casalj, Sicilia DOC, 2012 – Rapitalà

FIANO – CAMPANIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Radici, Fiano di Avellino DOCG, 2012 – Mastroberardino
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Fiano di Avellino DOCG, 2011 – Tenuta Sarno 1860

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Vigna della Congregazione, Fiano di Avellino DOCG, 2010 – Villa Diamante
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Fiano di Avellino DOCG, 2012 – Colli di San Domenico

My comments: These are great producers making great wines. I am particularly fond of the Sarno 1860 and Villa Diamante wines. While Sarno was one of the discoveries of the year for me last year, Villa Diamante is this year, as explained above. Fully merited medals here. Mastroberardino is, of course, the grand old producer in that area, and continues making great wine.

ROSE’ WINES – PUGLIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Metiusco, Salento Rosato IGT, 2012 – Palamà
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Girofle, Rosato Puglia IGP, 2012 – Severino Garofano vigneti e cantine, Tenuta Monaci

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Metiusco, Salento Rosato IGT, 2012 – Palamà
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Estrosa, Murgia IGT rosato, 2012 – Pietraventosa

My comments: Always a hard-fought category, since there is so much world-beating, fantastic rosé wine being made in Apulia, but I am happy to see three personal favourites winning here. The Metiusco is the more crowd-pleasing, overtly fruity wine, with the Estrosa forming a sort of middle ground on the way over to the sappy, juicy, dry and incredibly lovely Girofle.

ROSE’ WINES – CALABRIA, BASILICATA, SICILIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Rosa Manfredi, Aglianico del Vulture DOC, 2012 – Terre degli Svevi
JOINT 2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Pipoli rosato, Basilicata IGP, 2012 – Vigneti del Vulture
Rosa Nera, Eloro rosato DOC, 2012 – Marabino

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Millemetri, Rosato Etna DOC, 2011 – Feudo Cavaliere
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Rosa Manfredi, Aglianico del Vulture DOC, 2012 – Terre degli Svevi

My comments: Aglianico makes some fantastic rosés, as evidenced by the winners here. They strike me as having much the same attributes as rosés made from nebbiolo, with great raspberry fruitiness, minerality and acidity. Yummy.

RED WINES FROM RARE NATIVE GRAPES – PUGLIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Malia, IGT Salento, 2010 – Duca Carlo Guarini (Malvasia nera)
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Askos, IGT Salento, 2011 – Masseria Li Veli (Susumaniello)

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Malia, IGT Salento, 2010 – Duca Carlo Guarini (Malvasia nera)
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Askos, IGT Salento, 2011 – Masseria Li Veli (Susumaniello)

My comments: Another rare complete agreement among the juries. I love the 100% malvasia nera Malìa, without a doubt the best malvasia nera put on the market. It marries the traditional, soft plum fruit and sweet exotic spiciness of malvasia nera from the Salento with a lovely density and great minerality. There was a vertical tasting of several vintages of that wine this year, which I sadly could not participate in, but I am sure that it must have been lovely. Susumaniello is a lesser-known, but highly interesting variety that I foresee making quite a lot of waves in future, when many more plantings come of age.

NERO DI TROIA – PUGLIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Angelo Primo, IGT Puglia, 2009 – Cantine Paradiso
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Indigeno, Tavoliere Troia DOP, 2012 – Valentina Passalacqua

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Nero di Troia, Puglia IGP, 2011 – Cantine Spelonga
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Nero di Troia, Puglia IGP, 2010 – Rasciatano

My comments: There is so much great nero di troia being made these days. The juries must have had a hard time finding winners in this hard-fought category.

NEGROAMARO – PUGLIA
JOINT 1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Le Braci, Salento IGP, 2006 – Severino Garofano vigneti e catine, Tenuta Monaci
Alberelli di Negroamaro, Salento IGP, 2009 – L’Astore

2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Nerìo, Nardò riserva DOC, 2009 – Schola Sarmenti

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Nerìo, Nardò riserva DOC, 2009 – Schola Sarmenti
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
75 vendemmie, Salento rosso IGP, 2012 – Palamà

My comments: Strong showings by both Schola Sarmenti and Palamà here, but why Le Braci would not always win these shoot-outs in both juries I cannot understand. It normally simply stands head and shoulders above the competition. In the event, it had to accept just winning in the national jury.

MAGLIOCCO – CALABRIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Magno Megonio, IGT Val di Neto, 2010 – Librandi
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Libici 2008 – Casa Comerci

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Magliocco, IGP Calabria, 2012 – Ferrocinto
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Magno Megonio, IGT Val di Neto, 2010 – Librandi

My comments: Librandi is, of course, the original and great producer in Calabria, credited with also being the re-discoverer of magliocco. For me, though, Ferrocinto make the ultimate interpretation of this highly interesting variety, and its first place in the international jury is well-deserved.

NERO D’AVOLA – SICILIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Nero d’Avola, IGP Sicilia, 2011 – Principe di Corleone
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Nero d’Avola, Sicilia DOC, 2012 – Cantine Barbera

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Niuru, IGP Sicilia, 2010 – Verovini
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Don Luca, DOC Contessa Entellina, 2011 – Entellano

My comments: I really liked the juicy, elegant, balanced, yet strong and characterful, Niuru. One to watch.

AGLIANICO – CAMPANIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Aglianico, Irpinia DOC, 2009 – Donnachiara
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Aglianico, Irpinia DOC, 2008 – San Paolo

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Meminì, Irpinia DOC, 2008 – Cantine Guastaferro
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Cesco di Nece, S.Agata dei Goti DOC, 2008 – Mustilli

My comments: Another strong category. I had the great pleasure of tasting Guastaferro’s Meminì, and while this is by no means as powerful is his Primim Taurasi, it was a lovely, middle-weight, juicy and powerfully spicy and territorial effort, great complexity married to great drinkability.

AGLIANICO DEL VULTURE – BASILICATA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Likos, Aglianico del Vulture DOC, 2009 – Vigne Mastrodomenico
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Stupor Mundi, Aglianico del Vulture DOC, 2009 – Carbone Vini

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Damaschino, Aglianico del Vulture DOC, 2008 – Grifalco
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Likos, Aglianico del Vulture DOC, 2009 – Vigne Mastrodomenico

My comments: As stated above, these wines are coming on strongly, and all three wines here are great interpretations of the territory and the variety.

GAGLIOPPO – CALABRIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Batasarro, IGT Calabria, 2009 – Statti
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Jacca Ventu, Melissa DOC, 2012 – La Pizzuta del Principe

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Jacca Ventu, Melissa DOC, 2012 – La Pizzuta del Principe
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Don Giuvà, Cirò rosso classico superiore, 2010 – Du Cropio

My comments: Unfortunately I did not manage to taste the Stati and Pizzuta del Principe wines, but the Du Cropio wine certainly deserves its award.

PRIMITIVO – PUGLIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Rubinium 17°, Primitivo di Manduria DOP, 2012 – Soloperto
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Il Sogno, Gioia del Colle DOC, 2009 – Vinicola Imperatore

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Fatalone Riserva, Gioia del Colle DOC, 2006 – Fatalone
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Marzagaglia, IGT Rosso Puglia, 2009 – Tenuta Patruno Perniola

My comments: For general remarks on primitivo, see under Impressions above. I was happy to see two of my personal favourites, Fatalone and Patruno, receiving awards.

NERELLO – SICILIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Ghiaia Nera, IGT Sicilia, 2010 – Tasca di Almerita
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Don Blasco, IGT Nerello Mascalese, 2009 – Feudi Cavaliere

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Martinella, Etna rosso DOP, 2010 – Vivera
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Eruzione 1614, IGT Sicilia, 2011 – Planeta

TAURASI – CAMPANIA
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Taurasi DOCG 2008, Cantine Lonardo
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Primum riserva, Taurasi DOCG, 2004 – Cantine Guastaferro

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Primum riserva, Taurasi DOCG, 2004 – Cantine Guastaferro
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Opera Mia, Taurasi DOCG, 2008 – Tenuta Cavalier Pepe

My comments: Great showing by Guastaferro, a personal favourite, but Lonardo and Cavalier Pepe are of course also great producers, so much greatness on show here.

BEST ORGANIC WINE
1st WINE NATIONAL JURY
Primitivo di Manduria, 2010 Pirro Varone
2nd WINE NATIONAL JURY
Donnacandida, Sannio Aglianico DOC, 2010 – Cautiero

1st WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Nero di Troia, IGT Puglia, 2010 – Antica Enotria
2nd WINE INTERNATIONAL JURY
Primitivo di Manduria, 2010 Pirro Varone

It is probably rather obvious, but I love the Radici del Sud concept and format, and I would love to see it spread outside the boundaries of Southern Italy. There are so many fabulous wines from the South, and we need to spread the good word further.

Yours truly
Ole

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2 Responses to Radici Del Sud 2013 – Impressions and Results

  1. Paolo Ianna says:

    Ciao Ole… Potresti acquistare casa in Puglia, sta diventando la tua terza patria…Sono particolarmente contento che lo “Stupor Mundi” della Carbone Vini si sia distinto nella sua categoria. Grandissimo vino!!! Complimenti a Sara e alla sua famiglia, la passione premia…

    • Ole Udsen says:

      Ciao Paolo,

      Si, ma ho troppe case adesso…. Si, lo “Stupor Mundi” è veramente grande, ed amo il nome (di se, ed a causa del riferimento a Federico II, mezzo normanno, quindi mezzo danese):-)

      Abbracci
      Ole

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